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IROSUN MEJI / IROSO MELLI

Updated: Feb 7





IROSUN MEJI:

Shows us a good lesson about humbling ourselves even if we have . A level of superiority, in which ever arena one may think one to be " superior in ".




Many of the stanzas in Ìròsùn teach us to be careful in our actions, in case we do something that we will regret for the rest of our lives. Because of a feeling of superiority, whether of beauty or intellect, disaster strikes and humbles the self-centered traveler. This is poignantly illustrated by a story that speaks of how rats and mice became so fertile. They had become accustomed to do as they liked, there were few threats in the world which they could not hide. One day Cat arrived on earth. When Mouse saw Cat for the first time, he immediately recognized the danger, but instead of succumbing to fear, he walked past the cat and said, ‘What works for me might not work for you, what works for you might not work for me.




Cat stopped Mouse and engaged him in conversation, asking what he meant by that. Mouse said that Cat might look upon him as food or something to play with, but this would make him lose sight of the greater picture. Cat just laughed and told him that he could end him any day with his sharp teeth and fierce claws, that it was in his nature to kill and eat – or play – with the mouse. Mouse questioned Cat, asking if that was all he was, just a hungry killing machine, or could there be more to their predicament than this simple logic?




Cat became annoyed by the philosophical rhetoric of Mouse, and told him that we all do what we are designed to do. He was larger and far more lethal than Mouse, so it was natural that Mouse should serve as play and food for him. Mouse responded that it might be true, but it was still important to pay attention to the bigger picture. Cat became even more annoyed, and was about to finish this conversation when he felt a sharp pain in his neck as the watchful viper behind him struck. Arrogance, and its repercussions, is the constant theme in Ìròsùn.



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